Saturday, November 22, 2008

Salvador Dali


Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech (11 May 1904 – 23 January 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter born in Figueres, Catalonia, Spain. Dalí was a skilled draftsman, best known for the striking and bizarre images in his surrealist work. His painterly skills are often attributed to the influence of Renaissance masters. His best known work, 'The Persistence of Memory', was completed in 1931.

Salvador Dalí's artistic repertoire also included film, sculpture, and photography. He collaborated with Walt Disney on the Academy Award-nominated short cartoon Destino, which was released posthumously in 2003. He also collaborated with Alfred Hitchcock on Hitchcock's film Spellbound.

Widely considered to be greatly imaginative, Dalí had an affinity for doing unusual things to draw attention to himself. This sometimes irked those who loved his art as much as it annoyed his critics, since his eccentric manner sometimes drew more public attention than his artwork. The purposefully-sought notoriety led to broad public recognition and many purchases of his works by people from all walks of life.


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René Magritte


René François Ghislain Magritte (21 November 1898 – 15 August 1967) was a Belgian Surrealist artist. He became well known for a number of witty and amusing images.

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Piet Mondrian

Pieter Cornelis (Piet) Mondriaan, after 1912 Mondrian, (b. Amersfoort, Netherlands, 7 March 1872 — d. New York City, 1 February 1944) was a Dutch painter.

He was an important contributor to the De Stijl art movement and group, which was founded by Theo van Doesburg. He evolved a non-representational form which he termed Neo-Plasticism. This consisted of a grid of vertical and horizontal black lines and the use of the three primary colours.

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Friday, November 21, 2008

Pierre-Auguste Renoir


Pierre-Auguste Renoir (25 February 1841–3 December 1919) was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty, and especially feminine sensuality, it has been said that "Renoir is the final representative of a tradition which runs directly from Rubens to Watteau".

Renoir's paintings are notable for their vibrant light and saturated color, most often focusing on people in intimate and candid compositions. The female nude was one of his primary subjects. In characteristic Impressionist style, Renoir suggested the details of a scene through freely brushed touches of color, so that his figures softly fuse with one another and their surroundings.

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Paul Nash


Paul Nash, (11 May 1889 – 11 July 1946) was an English war artist.

At the outbreak of World War I, Nash enlisted in the Artists' Rifles and was sent to the Western Front in February 1917 as a second lieutenant in the Hampshire Regiment. A few days before the Ypres offensive he fell into a trench. He broke a rib and was invalided home. While recuperating in London, Nash worked from his front-line sketches to produce a series of drawings of the war. This work, which shows the influence of Blast and the Vorticist movement, was well-received when exhibited later that year at the Goupil Gallery.

As a result of this exhibition, Charles Masterman, head of the government's War Propaganda Bureau (WPB) recruited Nash as an official war artist.

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Thursday, November 20, 2008

Paul Gaugin

Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter.

Gaugin's bold experimentation with coloring led directly to the Synthetist style of modern art while his expression of the inherent meaning of the subjects in his paintings, paved the way to Primitivism and the return to the pastoral. He was also an influential exponent of wood engraving and woodcuts as art forms.

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Paul Cézanne


Paul Cézanne (19 January 1839 – 22 October 1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century.

Cézanne can be said to form the bridge between late 19th century Impressionism and the early 20th century's new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism. The line attributed to both Henri Matisse and Picasso that Cézanne "is the father of us all" cannot be dismissed.

Cézanne's work demonstrates a mastery of design, colour, composition and draftsmanship. His often repetitive, sensitive and exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognisable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields, at once both a direct expression of the sensations of the observing eye and an abstraction from observed nature. The paintings convey Cézanne's intense study of his subjects, a searching gaze and a dogged struggle to deal with the complexity of human visual perception.


Cezanne

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Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Lucian Freud

Lucian Michael Freud, OM, CH (born 8 December 1922) is a British painter. Freud was born in Berlin, Germany in 1922, son of Jewish parents Ernst Ludwig Freud, an architect, and Lucie née Brasch. He is the grandson of Sigmund Freud and brother of writer and politician Clement Raphael Freud and of Stephan Gabriel Freud.

Freud and his family moved to the U.K. in 1933 to escape the rise of Nazism, and gained British citizenship in 1939. During this period he attended Dartington Hall school in Totnes, Devon, and later Bryanston School.

Freud

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Jean Metzinger

Jean Metzinger (24 June 1883 – 3 November 1956) was a French painter. Initially he was influenced by Fauvism and Impressionism, but from 1908 he was associated with Cubism. Metzinger was a member of the Section d'Or group of artists. Certain pieces such as At the Cycle-Race track suggest speed and movement, ideas which are linked to the futurist movement.

Together with Albert Gleizes, Metzinger created the first major treatise on Cubism, 'Du Cubisme', in 1912. In the latter stages of his career, he moved away from cubism towards realism, while still retaining elements of cubist style.

Metzinger

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Francis Bacon


Francis Bacon (28 October 1909 – 28 April 1992) was an Irish figurative painter. He was a collateral descendant of the Elizabethan philosopher Francis Bacon. His artwork is known for its bold, austere, and often grotesque or nightmarish imagery.

Bacon

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Gilbert and George

Gilbert and George: Gilbert Prousch (or Proesch) (born in San Martin (San Martino), Italy, 11 September 1943) and George Passmore (born in Devon, England 8 January 1942), better known as Gilbert & George, are artists. They have worked almost exclusively as a pair.

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Francis Picabia


Francis-Marie Martinez Picabia (28 January 1879 - 30 November 1953) was a painter and poet. A large amount of his work involves the mechanical representation of people.

Picabia

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Franz Marc


Franz Marc (8 February 1880 – 4 March 1916) was one of the principal painters and printmakers of the German Expressionist movement.

Most of Marc's mature work portrays animals, usually in natural settings. His work is characterized by bright primary color, an almost cubist portrayal of animals, stark simplicity and a profound sense of emotion, which garnered notice in influential circles even in his own time.

Franz Marc's best known painting is probably Tierschicksale (also known as Animal Destinies or Fate of the Animals) completed in 1913, which hangs in the Basel Kunstmuseum in Basel.

Marc made some sixty prints, in woodcut and lithography.

In October 1998, several of Marc's paintings garnered record prices at Christie's art auction house in London, including Rote Rehe I (Red Deer I), which sold for £3.30m. This record was exceeded in October 1999, when Der Wasserfall (The Waterfall) was sold by Sotheby's in London to a private collector for £5.06m. This price set a record for both Franz Marc's work, and 20th century German painting.

Marc

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Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Mel Bochner


Mel Bochner (born 1940) is an American conceptual artist. Mr. Bochner received his BFA in 1962 and honorary Doctor of Fine Arts in 2005 from the School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University. He lives in New York City.

Starting in the 1960s, he evolved several of the exhibition strategies now taken for granted, including using the walls of the gallery as the subject of the work and using photo documentation of ephemeral and performance works. As Richard Kalina wrote in Art in America in 1996, Bochner was one of the earliest proponents, along with Joseph Kosuth and Bruce Nauman, of photo-documentation work in which the artist “created not so much a sculpture as a two-dimensional work about sculpture.”

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Fred Yates

Fred Yates (1922 to 2008) was an English painter who painted very much in the style of L S Lowry. Although, as Yates always and rightly maintained, his work was significantly different from that of Lowry the similarities are remarkable.

Yates spent much of his painting life in Cornwall and France.

Yates

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Ben Nicholson

Benjamin Lauder Nicholson OM, (10 April 1894 – 6 February 1982), known as Ben Nicholson, was an English abstract painter.

Nicholson

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Art and Language

Art & Language is a group of conceptual artists who have produced collaborative work under this name since the late 1960s.

The name Art & Language was first used in 1968 by the British artists Terry Atkinson, David Bainbridge, Michael Baldwin and Harold Hurrell, who had been collaborating on works since around 1966, and who were at that time teaching art in Coventry. Their early work, as well as their journal Art-Language which first appeared in 1969, is regarded as an important influence on much conceptual art both in the United Kingdom and in the United States.



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Geoff Bunn


Geoff Bunn (born 1963) is a British artist who can be considered as a latter day conceptualist. Primarily "just a painter", during the 1990's Bunn developed the idea of the random location of a set of artworks in the environment with the gradual release of clues to allow people to discover the nature and whereabouts of the pieces.

A further major element, often misunderstood, of Bunn's work is his mockery of the contemporary art world. For instance, he argues that "art is no longer about the object, the idea or about good art or bad art, but (solely) about the publicity surrounding the artist". And to this end he pokes fun at the art world with a raft of dissembling publicity.

In this respect Bunn follows a quizzically humorous tradition in art which reaches from William Hogarth through Marcel Duchamp to the Stuckists of today.

Bunn

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George Grosz

George Grosz (26 July 1893 – 6 July 1959) was a prominent member of the Berlin Dada and New Objectivity group, known especially for his savagely caricatural drawings of Berlin life in the 1920s.

Grosz

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Fernand Léger


Joseph Fernand Henri Léger (4 February 1881 – 17 August 1955) was a French painter, sculptor, and filmmaker.

Léger wrote in 1945 that "the object in modern painting must become the main character and overthrow the subject. If, in turn, the human form becomes an object, it can considerably liberate possibilities for the modern artist." As the first painter to take as his idiom the imagery of the machine age, and to make the objects of consumer society the subjects of his paintings, Léger has been called a progenitor of Pop Art.

Leger

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Monday, November 17, 2008

Henri Matisse


Henri Matisse (31 December 1869 – 3 November 1954) was a French artist, noted for his use of color and his fluid, brilliant and original draughtsmanship.

As a draughtsman, printmaker, and sculptor, but principally as a painter, Matisse is one of the best-known artists of the twentieth century. Although he was initially labeled as a Fauve, by the 1920s, he was increasingly hailed as an upholder of the classical tradition in French painting.

His mastery of the expressive language of color and drawing is apparent, in a body of work spanning over a half-century, and won him recognition as a leading figure in modern art.

Matisse

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Edward Hopper


Edward Hopper (22 July 1882 – 15 May 1967) was an American painter and printmaker. While most popularly known for his oil paintings, he was equally proficient as a watercolorist and printmaker in etching.

Hopper

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Edvard Munch

Edvard Munch (12 December 1863 – 23 January 1944) was a Norwegian Symbolist painter and printmaker, and an important forerunner of Expressionistic art.

His best-known painting, "The Scream" (1893), is one of the pieces in a series titled "The Frieze of Life", in which Munch explored the themes of life, love, fear, death, and melancholy. As with many of his works, he painted several versions of it.

Munch

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Sunday, November 16, 2008

Joan Miró


Joan Miró i Ferrà (20 April 1893 – 25 December 1983) was a Catalan (Spanish) painter, sculptor, and ceramist born in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain to the family of a Goldsmith and Watchmaker. His work has been interpreted variously as Surrealism, a sandbox for the subconscious mind, a re-creation of the childlike and a manifestation of Catalan pride.

In numerous interviews dating from the 1930s onwards, Miró expressed contempt for conventional painting methods and his desire to "kill", "murder", or "rape" them in favor of more contemporary means of expression.

Miro

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Joseph Beuys

Joseph Beuys (12 May 1921 – 23 January 1986) was an influential German artist who came to prominence in the 1960s.

He is most famous for his public performances and his energetic championing of the healing potential of art. As well as performances, Beuys produced sculptures, prints and posters, and thousands of drawings. A charismatic and controversial figure, the nature and value of Beuys’s contribution to Western art has elicited a hotly contested and often polarised debate.

Beuys

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Juan Gris


José Victoriano González-Pérez (23 March 1887 – 11 May 1927), better known as Juan Gris, was a Spanish painter and sculptor who lived and worked in France most of his life. His works are closely connected to the emergence of an innovative artistic genre — Cubism.

[[image http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/05/Juan_Gris_001.jpg/175px-Juan_Gris_001.jpg]]

Gris articulated most of his aesthetic theories during 1924 and 1925. He delivered his definitive lecture, Des possibilités de la peinture, at the Sorbonne in 1924. Major Gris exhibitions took place at the Galerie Simon in Paris and the Galerie Flechtheim in Berlin in 1923, and at the Galerie Flechtheim in Düsseldorf in 1925.

Gris

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