Saturday, January 3, 2009

Michael Asher

Michael Asher (born 1943 in Los Angeles, California) is a conceptual artist, described by The New York Times as "among the patron saints of the Conceptual Art phylum known as institutional critique, an often esoteric dissection of the assumptions that govern how we perceive art." Rather than designing new art objects, Asher typically alters the existing environment, by repositioning or removing artworks, walls, facades, etc.

Asher's work initially consisted of dividing up gallery spaces using partition walls and curtains, and designing environments that reflected or absorbed sound. His untitled 1991 work featuring a granite drinking fountain juxtaposed with a flag pole was his first permanent public outdoor work in the United States. It is part of the Stuart Collection of public art on the campus of the University of California, San Diego.

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Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Mel Bochner


Mel Bochner (born 1940) is an American conceptual artist. Mr. Bochner received his BFA in 1962 and honorary Doctor of Fine Arts in 2005 from the School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University. He lives in New York City.

Starting in the 1960s, he evolved several of the exhibition strategies now taken for granted, including using the walls of the gallery as the subject of the work and using photo documentation of ephemeral and performance works. As Richard Kalina wrote in Art in America in 1996, Bochner was one of the earliest proponents, along with Joseph Kosuth and Bruce Nauman, of photo-documentation work in which the artist “created not so much a sculpture as a two-dimensional work about sculpture.”

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Geoff Bunn


Geoff Bunn (born 1963) is a British artist who can be considered as a latter day conceptualist. Primarily "just a painter", during the 1990's Bunn developed the idea of the random location of a set of artworks in the environment with the gradual release of clues to allow people to discover the nature and whereabouts of the pieces.

A further major element, often misunderstood, of Bunn's work is his mockery of the contemporary art world. For instance, he argues that "art is no longer about the object, the idea or about good art or bad art, but (solely) about the publicity surrounding the artist". And to this end he pokes fun at the art world with a raft of dissembling publicity.

In this respect Bunn follows a quizzically humorous tradition in art which reaches from William Hogarth through Marcel Duchamp to the Stuckists of today.

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